Fishing Article By White Buffalo Outdoors

Why We Fish

We fish for one reason, a reason we can’t explain because we’re always thinking about fishing.

The intellectuals say we fish to escape life’s problems.  We reply, “Have you ever had a snag and lost a $7 hook?”

Some even think deeper and say, “They go fishing to live life, not escape it.”  We elaborate further, “There was a $3 sinker with that $7 hook.”

Don’t worry, fishermen’s personalities don’t run that dry.  We enjoy organizing tackle boxes and working on reels, every Saturday night.

Yes, we are like the rest of humankind.  We work 40 hours a week and work for “that” boss.  The only difference, our “that” boss thinks we are sick when we call in sick. 

Again, we are like the rest of human kind and tell the occasional lie, except when it comes to fishing. 

Alright, we exaggerate a little when explaining the length of the fish that got away.  One thing we can’t exaggerate are the pictures we take. 

The proof is there, right on our phones for the world to see!  Here come the critics. 

They say, “You’re holding the fish close to the phone to make it look bigger.”  We respond with dry personality, “You’re holding your head to close to my phone.”

In our community of fishermen, we have those few, the few who attempt to explain why we are different from all others.  The reality, we’re not. 

We are always recruiting new people to our world. The ones in training, always convert not because of force, but because of the personalities surrounding them while fishing. 

I will go out on a limb and try to explain why we fish.

We fish for one reason, a reason we can’t explain because we’re always thinking about fishing.

Justin J. Lind

January 2019
White Buffalo Outdoors

Fishing and Snapchat

5 Snapchat Tips for Fishermen

First, there were simple stories nobody believed. The old fishermen of the past would tell stories with arms as wide as they would stretch, as people around them rolled their eyes. As years passed, bulky cameras found their way into boats, providing proof of success all the while keeping certain details a secret.  Today, we use Snapchat.

Snapchat is a great tool to broadcast your awesome fishing pictures instantly to a long list of friends and fellow fishermen. However, if not used correctly, certain details you did not want others to know might show due to the app and the Snapchat user.

Here are your 5 tips to show your fish off, not your secrets.

5. Block Co-Workers!

Yes, it is true, the fishing community has a dirty secret–We sometimes call in sick and go fishing.

We also like to brag about our fish, especially on our Snapchat storyline for all our friends to see while they are hard at work. However, we sometimes forget details too, like those co-workers we added so long ago.

These co-workers might seem nice to your face, but they want that promotion just as bad as you do.

To block your co-workers from seeing your storyline follow these simple steps.

1. Click on your story in the top left corner and touch the 3 dots next to it. A window will appear.

2. Hit custom.

3. Scroll to your friends list and hit the names of the co-workers you want blocked.

 

You now can show your fish off in peace. The best part, Snapchat does not notify anyone that they have been blocked, eliminating possible tension in the workplace. These custom settings will now be permanently saved for any other “sick days” that might pop up in the future, eliminating worry.

4. Zoom In, a Lot!

Now that the co-workers are duped, it is time to dupe our fellow fishermen who may find themselves slightly jealous as they watch from work.

Your most productive fishing holes are productive because you have kept them a secret. A Snapchat picture showing landscape features in the background will give your favorite fishing hole away to any man or woman who knows the water, as well as you do.

Zoom in, and zoom in a lot! Have your amateur photographer/friend take the picture so that only water or a few trees are in the background.

Another benefit of zooming in is it makes your fish look bigger! But, do not forget to…

3. Take That Lure Out!

If prowling fishermen are onto your game because of your Snapchat, the last thing you want them to know is what you are catching those big fish with. Take that lure out and keep them guessing. Plus, it is safer to handle that floppy fish with no lure attached!

2. Turn Off Snap Map

If you really want to keep your fishing holes a secret, turn off your Snap Map.

Snap Map is a location-sharing feature where your Snapchat friends can see a cartoon figure of you on a topographic map. This feature is surprisingly accurate and the more your friends zoom in, the more accurate your location becomes. Snap Map will update every time you open the app and when you are taking Snapchats.

To turn off Snap Map follow these simple steps.

1. Launch the app and pinch the screen. Snap Map will open.

2. Hit the gear icon in the top right corner.

3. Select “Ghost Mode.”

Another concerning quality of Snap Map is how well the feature drains your battery life, which is essential for any emergency situation that may arise.

1. Smile Big

Most importantly, smile big! Show your Snapchat friends and fellow fishermen that you are the boss of the water!

Like White Buffalo Outdoors on Facebook.

Follow White Buffalo Outdoors on Instagram!

Justin J. Lind

August 2018
White Buffalo Outdoors

About the White Buffalo Outdoors Logo

About the White Buffalo Outdoors Logo

White Buffalo Outdoors loves its country and designed its logo to honor the United States and conservation.

In May of 2016, President Barack Obama signed into the law the National Bison Legacy Act, designating the bison “American buffalo” the official mammal of the United States.

We have put a circle around our American buffalo to bring attention to its story. The American buffalo once roamed our Great Plains by the millions. With western settlement and unethical practices, the American buffalo nearly became extinct with only 1,000 left. Through conservation efforts these numbers are now exceeding 500,000.

Not only does the American buffalo have a history of vigor, it is also known as a symbol of potential. The Lakota American Indians believe the birth of a sacred white buffalo is a sign of hope and of good times to come.

The American buffalo embodies the American spirit with its resilience and strength. Thank you to all outdoorsmen who continue to fund and support conservation movements. Your continued contributions are making a difference in preserving the American outdoors.

Justin J. Lind

January 2019
White Buffalo Outdoors

Iowa Turtle Trappers

Turtle Trappers Under Siege

Both commercial and recreational turtle trappers will soon have new regulations to follow in Iowa.  House File 2357 (2016) gives the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (I.D.N.R.) permission to implement new regulations on the trappers.  Regulations include strict daily catch limits and closing the year round season from May 14th to July 16th.

The new regulations on turtle trappers were fueled by the following organizations:

  • Center for Biological Diversity
  • Center for Food Safety
  • Center for North American Herpetology
  • Center for Reptile and Amphibian Conservation Management
  • Iowa Chapter of the Sierra Club
  • Tallgrass Prairie Audubon Society

These 6 organizations sent in a petition to the I.D.N.R. to immediately ban all turtle trapping in Iowa.  The petition was denied, but forced the I.D.N.R. to create a committee that eventually set the new regulations.

Are Turtle Trappers in Iowa the people to blame?

According the Joint Committee on Turtle Harvest (2013), other threats to Iowa turtles include:

  • Row crop production
  • Rural and urban development
  • Channelization of rivers and streams
  • Erosion of banks on rivers
  • Construction of highways and roads
  • Mammalian predation
  • Collection of turtles for pets
  • The destruction of wetlands
  • Car vs. turtle collisions
  • Surrounding states not allowing turtle trapping (p.9).
The Negative Impacts to the Trappers

According to the Natural Resources Commission and Iowa Department of Natural Resources (2016), between 2012-2015 the commercial turtle industry in Iowa consisted of an average of 145 harvesters out of the 3.1 million people who live in Iowa. The commission and I.D.N.R. found income derived by most commercial harvesters is used to supplement other income sources including farming, social security and fur harvesting.  With the new regulations, many of these trappers feel they cannot make ends meet. The new regulations would not only directly impact the trappers but also the economy and others in the state (p.7).

Administrative Rules Turtles

The Iowa Trappers Association also conducted their own study and found that 10 Iowa small businesses would close and 15 Iowans would be put out of work.

What’s Next for Turtle Trappers in Iowa

Under House File 2357 it is required the I.D.N.R. put together a commission that will conduct a 5-year study on the sustainability of Iowa’s turtle populations.  The commission is to report their findings to the General Assembly by January 1, 2021 to see if the restrictions on commercial and recreational turtle trappers should be revised.

Your Opinion Matters

Please let White Buffalo Outdoors know what  you think about the new regulations being put on turtle trappers in Iowa in the comments section below.

If you live in Iowa, let your voice be heard and contact your local legislator at https://www.legis.iowa.gov/legislators/find

Justin J. Lind

September 2017
White Buffalo Outdoors

Reference

Gritters, S., Osterkamp, K., Weiss, D., Dolan, C., Mason, M., Kinkead, K., & Steuck, M. (n.d.). Iowa’s Commercial Turtle Harvest (United States, Iowa Department of Natural Resources)

United States, Iowa Department of Natural Resources. (n.d.). Administrative Rules GOVERNOR’S OFFICE PRECLEARANCE FORM (pp. 1-13).

Picture Provided By: Bernell MacDonald https://pixabay.com/en/users/Bernell-2855442/

 

Iowa Kayak Anglers

No Motor No Problem: The Iowa Kayak Anglers

An old way of fishing is the newest trend sweeping across Iowa.

The Iowa Kayak Anglers (IKA) will soon be paddling the waters of Iowa and are inviting all fishermen who own a kayak to join them in their upcoming adventures.

IKA is a non-profit organization founded in 2013 by Scott Shrader. “I started IKA to see if anybody else around me had the same passion for kayak fishing as I did. This year, we expect over 50 fishermen at each of our 6 tournaments held across Iowa.”

During the tournaments you can expect friendly competition, camping, and cookouts! Scott Shrader explains, “All our tournaments are bass fishing only and we practice C.P.R. which means catch, photo, and release. Fishermen in the IKA tournaments win based off the length of 5 fish combined, not weight.”

Scott explains that fishing out of a kayak has many advantages. First, fishing from a kayak is a lot cheaper than a traditional boat. Second, fishing from a kayak allows you as a fisherman access to a variety of smaller lakes and rivers where motor boats cannot go.

The IKA has a busy 2018 season with 6 tournaments and 1 championship tournament. The IKA is also proud to announce their new youth division that will hopefully attract more young adults to kayak fishing and the outdoors.

The IKA’s mission is to provide a fun and safe environment for anglers of any skill level and welcome anyone with a passion for kayak fishing.

To join the growing community of Iowa kayak fishermen, visit their WEBSITE.

Do not forget to follow the IKA on Facebook for pictures and updates on tournaments.

Justin J. Lind

March 2018
White Buffalo Outdoors

Positive Outdoor Facebook Pages

The Top 5 Most Positive Outdoor Facebook Groups You Must Follow

Outdoorsmen are flocking to Facebook groups in search of a community full of like-minded individuals who love the outdoors as much as they do. However, they soon find out some of these groups are full of negativity, judgmental comments, and inappropriate posts which do not represent the outdoor culture they grew up in. After a few short days, these outdoorsmen click the “Leave Group” button and continue their never-ending hunt for the right group.

The hunt is finally over.

White Buffalo Outdoors scanned Facebook page after Facebook page and found 5 outdoor groups full of positivity, entertainment, and knowledge guaranteed to make you feel at home. The administrators along with the members are welcoming and so encouraging, you will not have any hesitation on posting pictures or asking for advice.

Here are your top 5.

5. Midwest Fishing Group

If you like to laugh, you will love the Midwest Fishing Group! The members of this group are always posting funny videos, memes, and pictures that will have you coming back for more.

Midwest Fishing Group does a weekly photo contest with a sponsor. You post a picture under the post for a chance to win free fishing gear! What makes these giveaways unique is the person with the gigantic fish does not always win. This week Midwest Fishing Group asked members to post a picture of the most interesting thing they caught while fishing. Again, you want to laugh? Look at what was posted!

The members of Midwest Fishing Group clearly support one another, which shows in their timeline. Members who have questions about anything fishing always receive a positive answer.

The people of the Midwest are known for their joking personalities, politeness, and willingness to help others. These traits are guaranteed to be found in the Midwest Fishing Group.

4. Fishing Community

Fishing Community is full of fishermen from all over the world who catch amazing fish you probably have never seen in your life! The members posting these pictures and videos are glad to answer any questions about what kind of fish they caught and where. If you join this group and decide to post a picture of your catch, expect a lot of positive feedback!

What makes Fishing Community unique is their willingness to help veterans. Throughout their timeline you will see posts networking veterans to fishing opportunities they may have never found without the support of the members.

The comradery in Fishing Community is strong and their drive to get more people fishing is incredible. This comradery along with the willingness to get more people in the outdoors makes Fishing Community one of the top Facebook leaders in conservation.

Monster Flathead Fish Caught in Iowa
3. Trapping Talk

If you want advice from some of the best trappers in the world, you must join Trapping Talk. The amount of trapping knowledge found on this page will no doubt make you a better trapper and outdoorsmen.

In Trapping Talk, you will find a close-knit group of over 35,000 individuals who LIVE the trapping lifestyle. You will find pictures and videos of trapping sets that you have never seen or thought of before. If you have any questions about your own trapping sets or anything related to the outdoors, these men and women will be glad to help you. Between all the trapping knowledge and advice, you will find incredible outdoor photography, amazing taxidermy mounts, and outdoor articles relating to trapping and hunting.

Trappers are some of the best outdoorsmen in the woods and have knowledge you cannot find anywhere else. Without trappers, conservation simply does not exist. If you want to become a better outdoorsman, head to Trapping Talk and start reading!

2. Hunting Community

In Hunting Community you can expect so much more than just hunting pictures! This community of over 15,000 members post great fishing pictures, hilarious GIF’s, and memes that will have you rolling on the ground.

The members of Hunting Community post lots of trail cam pictures that you will not find on any other outdoor website or Facebook page. Many of these trail cam pictures have in them huge deer that will make you wish it was hunting season again! Other trail cam pictures show bobcats, bear, elk, and so much more.

If you want to learn more about shooting hunting rifles and bow hunting, then Hunting Community is the right Facebook page for you. This group of top-notch hunters will gladly answer any questions you have in a respectful and encouraging way.

What makes Hunting Community a stand-out page is the members willingness to help one another. A member will post a question and soon follows several positive comments that are detailed and helpful. Members on this page are clearly humble individuals that keep an open-mind with every post.

Hunting Community is so much more than just hunting. Surround yourself with amazing men and women who love the outdoors and join Hunting Community!

1. Habitat Managers

If you are interested in expanding your outdoor knowledge to a whole new level, Habitat Managers is your page to follow.

The expertise found in Habitat Managers is unmatched. Simply put, you will always get the right answer to anything related to the outdoors. Members in this group are happy to answer any questions related to horticulture, invasive species, avian wildlife, and so much more. If you want to learn more about food plots, pesticide application, and timber stand improvements, you have found your favorite Facebook page.

Habitat Managers will not short change you in the world of hunting including deer, turkey, and upland game. Some members even post their outdoor artwork, which is some of the best in the country!

What made Habitat Manager number one on the list is not the abundance of information found, but the members willingness to give the right information. Members ensure others are correctly and safely doing this land management work, which proves they are always looking out for one another.

Always strive to be a better outdoorsman. Learn what is growing around you in the woods and learn more about the animals in it, not just the animal you are hunting. Join, Habitat Managers.

These 5 groups are the true representation of the American outdoors and our outdoor culture. Positive communities like Midwest Fishing Group, Fishing Community, Trapping Talk, Hunting Community, and Habitat Managers encourage more people to join our great outdoor sports. Without new members our rights as hunters, fishermen, and trappers will fade and the next generation will not have the opportunities we have today.

Thank you to all the members and administrators for your continued dedication to conservation and the American outdoors.

Justin J. Lind

June 2018
White Buffalo Outdoors

How to Use Bluegills for Flathead Bait

Prepare Your Bluegill Bait for Success

As a flathead fisherman, you spend countless hours preparing, just in case “the big one” bites. The last thing you would want is the fish spitting your bait before you set the hook. How do you prevent this? By a pair of 99¢ nail clippers and keep them close by.

Bluegills have a spiny dorsal fin used as a defense mechanism.  When a predator attempts to swallow them, the bluegill will flex their dorsal fin to puncture the predator.

To ensure “the big one” can swallow without hesitation, you will need to disarm the bluegill by following these simple steps:

  1. Lay the bluegill on your palm (non-dominant hand).
  2. Take the tips of your fingers with the same hand (non-dominant hand) and work the dorsal fin out flat, exposing the spines.
  3. Take the nail clippers and snip the sharp ends off about a quarter inch down. Do this to every spiny fin until the dorsal fin is smooth.
  4. Hook your bluegill in your preferred spot and you are ready to fish!

Good luck fishing and please send White Buffalo Outdoors a picture of your next monster flathead and we would be happy to post in the Trophy Room!

Justin J. Lind

September 2017
White Buffalo Outdoors

How to Flathead Fish

How to Flathead Fish: The Basics

Is fishing in the hot sun getting old?  Do you find yourself sitting on your couch on a Saturday night wishing you were fishing?  Are you new to fishing altogether?

I’ve been an avid angler since a child, fishing for walleyes, crappie, and Northern Pike.  Like most anglers, I find my “fix” during the winter months, sitting on a bucket, and staring at a hole drilled through the ice.  I even venture down to Texas a few times a year, casting for speckled trout, flounder, red fish, and bull sharks.

Fishing for all these different species, I always find myself gravitating back to flathead fishing.  Many assume flathead fishing comes easy because the fish falls under the catfish family, which is abundant worldwide.  However, this is far from the truth.  Flathead fishing takes skill, creativity, organization, and patience. This article lists the necessities and basic strategies needed for you to be successful on your new angling adventure – flathead fishing.

Gear and Tools Needed

Heavy duty rod and reel (2)
Headlamp (for each person)
Spotlight (1)
Large net (1)
Bug spray (1)
Large pair of pliers (1)
Large heavy duty stringer (1)
Comfortable chair (for each person)
Nail clippers (to cut fishing line)
Cooler with aerator (if you’re using live bait)
Bait net
State fishing license

Suggested Tackle

30-50 pound test line for reel (bring extra)
Large J style hook (10-15)
2-3 ounce egg style sinkers (10-15)
Ball bearing swivels with split rings (10-15)

Bait

Flathead are predators and they prey on other fish and live baits.  Common baits used by flathead anglers include: shad, crayfish, bullheads and nightcrawlers.  My preference for bait is live bluegills about 3-4 inches in length.  If you use bluegills, it is crucial to keep them alive in a cooler full of water and an aerator. You must change the water out every half hour if the outside air temperature is high.  In cooler weather, you can get away with changing the water every two hours.

Checking your state laws on what bait is legal to use is also important.  If you cannot find this information, call your local conservation officer and ask.

Where to Fish

Knowing where to fish for flathead takes experience and perseverance. My first suggestion when fishing a new location is to study an aerial map of the river. It may be advantageous to check out the location in person to study the structures, sand bars, deep holes, and currents.

When night approaches, fish different portions of the river and change spots every 45 minutes. Doing this, will allow you to piece together where and what the fish are doing.

There are many variables to consider, such as: air temperature, water temperature, bait hatches, river levels, and spawns. The only way to understand the variables is to get on the river and be creative!

Most Important

Have fun and learn on the way! The Internet will not have all the answers. Only experience with a little luck will set you on the right path down the river.

Justin J. Lind

September 2017
White Buffalo Outdoors

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